Theodore Roosevelt, our 26th president from 1901-1909, developed an interest in the Navy early in life. As a student at Harvard in 1882 young “Teddy” wrote "The Naval War of 1812" establishing his credentials as a serious historian. Among his many roles in serving his country, he became Assistant Secretary of the Navy in 1897 and was instrumental in preparing the Navy for the Spanish-American War. He later went on to be the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize and the Congressional Medal of Honor.

Theodore Roosevelt, our 26th president from 1901-1909, developed an interest in the Navy early in life. As a student at Harvard in 1882 young “Teddy” wrote "The Naval War of 1812" establishing his credentials as a serious historian. Among his many roles in serving his country, he became Assistant Secretary of the Navy in 1897 and was instrumental in preparing the Navy for the Spanish-American War. He later went on to be the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize and the Congressional Medal of Honor.

The Navy League of the United States 

Theodore Roosevelt, our 26th president, developed an interest in the Navy early in life. As a student at Harvard in 1882 young “Teddy” wrote "The Naval War of 1812" establishing his credentials as a serious historian. Among his many roles in serving his country, he became Assistant Secretary of the Navy in 1897 and was instrumental in preparing the Navy for the Spanish-American War. He later went on to be the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize and the Congressional Medal of Honor. He served as President of the United states from 1901-1909.

In 1902, a small group of business owners and Navy supporters gathered in New York City to form a patriotic organization dedicated to the maintenance of our nation’s maritime strength.  They sought to develop an independent organization, beholden to no one, which could speak in support of the Navy and educate the American people on significant maritime issues impacting on our nation’s security and prosperity.  President Theodore Roosevelt believed in the formation of a Navy League so strongly that he contributed his Nobel Peace Prize award of $500 toward the cost of starting the Navy League and keeping it going.  

Today, the Navy League is engaged in carrying out a variety of programs to inform and educate all our citizens - including our elected officials - on the importance of sea power. The Navy League is equally involved in the support of the men and women of our Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, U.S.- flag Merchant Marine, and their families.  Membership in the Navy League is open to all Americans not on active duty in the U.S. military.

The Navy League’s youth programs are an integral part of our efforts.  The U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps is a national program providing recreation and maritime training for over 10,000 boys and girls, ages 11 through 17.  This program endeavors to instill in these youth the principals of seamanship, patriotism, and good citizenship while fostering a sense of duty, discipline, self-esteem, and respect for others.

The work of the Navy League is accomplished through a national Headquarters staff and more than 245 local councils worldwide.  The Navy League has 43,000 individual members, 150 corporate members, and over 330 Community Affiliate members.

The Mission of the Navy League

Mission Statement: The Navy League of the United States is a civilian organization dedicated to informing the American people and their government that the United States of America is a maritime nation and that its national defense and economic well being are dependent upon strong sea services - United States Navy, United States Marine Corps, United States Coast Guard and United States Merchant Marine

Goals:

  • Educate national leaders and the nation.
  • Support the men and women of the sea services.
  • Provide assistance to sea service families.
  • Support youth programs.

Learn more about the Navy League
View a Navy League video